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Full text of "Color on canvas: an educational exhibit consisting of original paintings supplementary to the Ways of Seeing exhibition."

Color on Canvas 

An Educational Exhibit 
consisting of 
Original Paintings 
supplementary to the 

"Ways of Seeing" 
Exhibition 



Worcester 
Art Museum 



COLOR ON CANVAS 



THIS is the first of a series of exhibitions 
prepared by the Educational Department 
of the Museum as a supplement to the Ways 
of Seeing exhibition. (For description of 
Ways of Seeing, turn to last section of this 
sheet.) 

Color on Canvas is an interpretive ex- 
hibition consisting of two main sections: 
1. a group of paintings from the Museum's 
collections; and 2. a series of charts illus- 
trating the three-dimensional character of 
color. 

The exhibit aims to show how artists in 
the past used color, and how the scientific 
experiments in color and light of the nine- 
teenth and twentieth centuries gave impetus 
to a more serious study of color and in- 
fluenced the work of modern artists to such 
an extent that color took on a vastly more 
subtle significance. 



WORCESTER ART MUSEUM 

WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS 



SCIENCE CHARTS 

THE THREE-FOLD NATURE OF 
COLOR 

Physical 

i. Color is light 

2. Objects absorb and reflect light 

3. Color mixtures 

4. Pigment versus light mixtures 

Physiological 

5. Color vision — the eye 

6. Evolution of the color sense 

Psychological 

7. Color is sensation 

8. Environment affects the appearance of 

colors 

PAINTINGS 



COLOR IDENTIFIES OBJECTS: 

SURFACE COLOR 

1. Eleanor of Portugal 

Jan S. Van Hemessen, 

Flemish, 1500/4-1566 

Surface colors are colors which are 
taken to be invariable and which help 
us to know our environment. They are 
the colors we ordinarily associate with 
objects; i.e., red apple, green grass. 



COLOR INTERPRETS NATURE: 

ATMOSPHERIC COLOR 

2. Italian Landscape 

Jan Both, Dutch, 1610-1652 

3. St. Tropez (Les Eucalyptus) 

Pierre Bonnard, French, 1867- 

Atmospheric or film color is the color 
of the empty space between ourselves 
and objects. It does not represent any 
fixed quality of color, but affects the 
appearance of objects in space. 

COLOR CREATES FORM: 

STRUCTURAL COLOR 

4. Landscape 

Paul Cezanne, French, 1839-1906 

Structural color represents the power of 
color to create an illusion of solidity. 

COLOR USED AS DECORATION 

5. The Goldfish Bowl 

Henri Matisse, French, 1869- 

Decorative color is color used for color's 
sake in order to create certain visual 
sensations. 

COLOR EXPRESSES MOOD: 

PSYCHOLOGICAL COLOR 

6. La Femme Accroupie 

Paul Gauguin, French, 1848-1903 

Psychological color implies the use of 
color to express human moods and 
emotions. 



"WAYS OF SEEING" 

Ways of Seeing, an experiment in visual 
education, was designed by Lee Simonson, and 
made possible through a grant by the 
Carnegie Corporation of New York. 

This exhibition demonstrates for the lay- 
man the elements common to all visual 
arts — line, form and color. This is done 
through a series of dioramas and reproduc- 
tions which are explained by means of mod- 
ulated loud speakers, in place of the customary 
written labels. In method of presentation, 
Ways of Seeing follows the technique em- 
ployed in the Futurama and General Motors 
Exhibition at the New York World's Fair. 

There are three main divisions. The first 
demonstrates how an artist can express 
himself with line alone; the second section 
shows the various ways in which an artist 
makes use of tone, contrasts of light and 
shade defining form; the third section deals 
with color and its effect on the pictorial 
rendering of form and space. 

Color on Canvas follows the concluding 
section of Ways of Seeing. 



WAYS OF SEEINQ is open to the 
Public daily at half hour intervals from 
z. 00-4.50 p.m. and at other times by 
appointment.